Author Topic: Street Names  (Read 14725 times)

Meg

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2010, 07:13 PM »
Hi Martin
In Waterloo
The lower part of Downshaw Road was named Wellington Street East with Wellington Street West going down by the side of the Wellington Pub.
Treehouse Avenue used to be Buckley Street

Of course the street names in Waterloo such as Blucher, Ney etc came straight from the Battle

I often wondered about Downing Street (was it called after its more famous London counterpart)?

Beechmount on the Downshaw estate (every house had a small beech tree planted in its garden when the houses were built)

Wonder where Wilshaw came from as in Wilshaw Grove, Wilshaw Lane?
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Martin

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2010, 09:44 PM »
Hi Martin
In Waterloo
The lower part of Downshaw Road was named Wellington Street East with Wellington Street West going down by the side of the Wellington Pub.
Treehouse Avenue used to be Buckley Street

Of course the street names in Waterloo such as Blucher, Ney etc came straight from the Battle

Hi Meg - I take it you haven't looked at the page, then? I've got all those mentioned already!

I often wondered about Downing Street (was it called after its more famous London counterpart)?

Beechmount on the Downshaw estate (every house had a small beech tree planted in its garden when the houses were built)

Wonder where Wilshaw came from as in Wilshaw Grove, Wilshaw Lane?

It seems to be some sort of local name. On the 1848 map there is a farm called Wilshaw where Wilshaw Grove is now. There is also Wilshaw Wood in Downshaw Clough, a house called Wilshaw Dale Grove where Dale Grove School is now and a small mill called Wilshaw Mill where Rock Mill was later built. (Rock Mill used the octagonal chimney built for Wilshaw Mill.)
Martin

Meg

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #17 on: September 04, 2010, 03:12 PM »
I had looked at your list, Martin but when I looked again I realised you had all those already so apologies.
Taunton Road was originally known as Oldham Old Road as opposed to the newer road which we now know as Oldham Road.
Origins of Crowhill ??
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Vanessa

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #18 on: September 04, 2010, 10:14 PM »
From "Five Thousand Acres of Ashton" by Winifred Bowman.

The Actual Crowhill is the hump of land rising off the old Turnpike, now called Taunton Road, above Brookfield. Here was Crowhill Farm itself, but now it is just a group of cottages.........
The name Crowhill farm was transfered to the new farm building in the fields beyond, now used as temporary offices for the Crowhill Building Estate.

When we got the deeds to our house on Crowhill we found that the land had been owned by Mr Walton, hence the Walton Street just off Newmarket Road.

Vanessa

mikep56

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2012, 12:00 PM »
Martin

Maybe a bit late now but this might be interesting for you..

http://www.closedpubs.co.uk/lancashire/ashtonunderlyne.html

Mike
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Phil Blinkhorn

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2013, 09:23 PM »
Regarding Buckley St/Tree House Avenue, I lived at 21 Buckley St as a child from 1948 to 1953.  The street was renamed after we moved to another part of town but the name was long a source of mystification.

Why rename the street at all?  The contemporary thinking was that certain influential people in the street didn't want to live on a "street" and the "avenue" bit was nothing more than gentrification.

The Tree House bit is alleged to have come from the fact that there was a child's tree house in one of the large trees in a garden of a house at the bottom right of the street.  Why that should influence a street name is anyone's guess but it's certainly more logical than the idea of a corruption of Three Houses, which apart from the fact that no councillors were fluent in cod Irish, was totally inaccurate as the house numbers attest.

On another tack, was Newman St named after John Henry Newman?

Martin

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2013, 10:46 PM »
Hello Phil. I would think it almost certain that Newman Street was NOT named after John Henry Newman.

Newman Street appears under that name on the 1845 map and was built some time before that date. 1845 was the year that John Henry Newman, an Anglican priest, converted to Catholicism. It was not until 1878 that he became a Cardinal. I don't think he would have been well-known enough in the 1830s or 1840s to name a street in Ashton after him!

Having said that, I can't find any reference to any Newman in Ashton. Mrs Bowman doesn't mention the name. It may have been the name of a mill owner or someone who had farmed on the land before the houses were built.
Martin

Too shy

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2013, 11:52 PM »
Phil, Just a long shot but (your) Buckley Street may have lost its name because there was another Buckley Street in Ashton-under-Lyne and it was decided that one would need to be renamed. Before Ashton-under-Lyne was the shape and size it is now, there were surrounding administrative districts which eventually became part of Ashton-under-Lyne. A couple of examples spring to mind, Hurst and Limehurst. I think both of these, by about the end of the forties had ceased to exist as independent administrative districts. There is a Buckley Street in Audenshaw - whether this street was part of the conundrum, who knows?

Ashtonian54

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #23 on: June 07, 2013, 05:35 AM »
Speaking of Newman Street, where did Shaw Brook disappear to?

Phil Blinkhorn

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #24 on: June 07, 2013, 12:44 PM »
Martin, thanks for your answer.  Given almost all the other names of the streets in the area are either ducal title or ducal family names I'm wondering if Newman was the family name of a lesser known titled personage or even that of the developer.

Too Shy, The rural district of Limehurst was only incorporated into Ashton in 1954 so presumably its Buckley St was deemed to be the duplication, even though the postal address had long been Limehurst, Ashton-under-Lyne.

Presumably the dropping of the word street was a nod to its more rural location but the thoroughfare hardly justifies either of the two main criteria for the name, i.e. either a straight road landscaped and lined with trees or shrubs to both sides or, alternatively, a straight, high capacity thoroughfare.  No wonder there were mutterings of gentrification!  That being said the lower end of the road is still a pleasant place to be.

Martin

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #25 on: June 07, 2013, 09:08 PM »
On the web page that started this topic, I listed the streets in Ashton that have changed their names, and I pointed out that: "in many cases this happened where two streets had the same name, particularly after the inclusion of Hurst and Limehurst into the town."

Having said that, in the case of Buckley Street, there isn't currently a street of that name in Ashton. I don't know whether there was ever one that has since disappeared with re-development.

Since starting this topic in 2010, I have split the page into two separate pages.
Origins of Street Names of Ashton under Lyne
and
Changing Street Names of Ashton under Lyne
Martin

lydia

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #26 on: June 07, 2013, 10:40 PM »
Thankyou Martin, really interesting, ,need to read them again slowly, some of the name changes are common sense but a couple made me laugh i.e Cow Lane to Ney Street, and the origins are very good to read up on, as I lived near Villiers, Cobden,Bright st whilst living for 15 years on Currier Lane I did know the history of these but enjoyed widening my knowledge on the others.

Too shy

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #27 on: June 07, 2013, 11:40 PM »
A slight digression but retaining the theme of streets having their names changed. Myra Hindley lived with her grandmother on Beasley Street in Gorton at about the same time that the street was peculiarly renamed Bannock Street. There are three  interesting black and white photographs on the Manchester City Council image archive - little lads in short pants, old gas street lamps, a pram on the pavement, Brooke Bond Tea adverts on the side of the corner shop. Just typical dirty northern back streets of the 50s and 60s. Within a couple of years the area was completely obliterated.

Martin

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #28 on: June 08, 2013, 07:52 AM »
a couple made me laugh i.e Cow Lane to Ney Street,

The one that made me laugh was changing West Street, Hurst, to East Street.
Martin

Son of Nomad

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Re: Street Names
« Reply #29 on: June 08, 2013, 01:42 PM »
Having said that, in the case of Buckley Street, there isn't currently a street of that name in Ashton. I don't know whether there was ever one that has since disappeared with re-development.
My Auntie Harriet lived on Buckley Street - it was a short street that ran parallel to Manchester Road. I've not been there for decades but I fear it was swept away by the 'God of the Internal Combustion Engine'.