Author Topic: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES  (Read 29191 times)

greeny

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WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« on: May 11, 2009, 08:59 PM »
HI   whats happening to the bees  we have flowers out in the garden one time they would be swarming with bees but just the odd one or two the srangest thing happen the other week when a bumble bee flew in the house it was falling over and looked drunk , since then when i have been out and about i have noticed it a few times and my daughter saw at least five bumble bees dead on the way to work the other week , i have started to take more interest in them since i  saw a documentry on tv last week , its a bit scarry what could happen if there were no bees , i know a lot have got this bug but it seems to be world wide apart from australia which are exporting bees , so i know people on this board live far and wide ,so could you please let us know how the bee count in your area is thank you  regards greeny ???

Vanessa

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2009, 10:33 PM »
I've found a few dead Bumble Bees too, the very large ones. ???

Vanessa

Joyce_in_Canada

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2009, 01:02 PM »
Even though I only have very early Spring flowers blooming just now - tulips, ground phlox, flowering crab trees, etc. (and we have a very heavy frost this morning) - I have at least one huge bumble bee flitting around my front planter.   Athough I've heard and read about the bumble bee scare, they seem to still be around my big perennial garden in fair numbers throughout the summer.  I just hope they keep coming back!   I'm sure they're visiting other neighbours too as I've just discovered a new white bleeding heart which has sprung up - most likely being from being cross-pollinated because I only had one pink plant before!  ;D 

paul_b

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2009, 04:27 PM »
The Bees in my gardens here in Bolton seem hunky dorey at the moment Greeny. Was out in the garden about an hour ago and was about a dozen buzzing about. Will let you know if anything changes.

ashtonmasher

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2009, 06:50 AM »
We have been exporting Bee's to USA as they have had a bug which gets in the hives and eats the young before they hatch, and also infests the bees them self and kills them. So they are being very careful here it would be devastating if it got in Australia.
Stella

greeny

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2009, 11:19 AM »
hi all thanks for sending your post on bees , up to now its a bit hit and miss where some bees are thriving and some are not , its seems to be the rural area that are seeing  the change in the bee population ,  lots of experts are blaming it on pesticides , and some are saying because of the two last summers being bad , i also recall last summer is not seeing many dragon flies , and daddy long leg to when the summers were good , could that be a reason ?

jaywit

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2009, 02:33 PM »
I know someone born in Thomson Manitoba that calls Daddylong legs mosquito's,I know they are generally bigger up there but not that big surely.

greeny

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2009, 01:26 PM »
hi i was reading the other day that they were saying if this bug that is killing the bees off is not sorted out the honey bee will be gone in ten years , as the saying goes first the bees 7 years after the human race scarry

Fudge

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2009, 06:49 PM »
Makes you wonder as the dinosaurs went Extinct over many years. Now lots of our creatures are vanishing . Are we going to alter again or carry on as we are. I won't know be long gone but it is scary when you look at how things are changing even the Butterfly is vanishing and it all as a knock on effect Fudge

greeny

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2009, 08:29 PM »
hi  i have been watching chelsea flower show ,i see there is a garden made out of plastercine flowers lawn trees even the slugs snails and ladybirds and bees i wonder if he had in mind when all the bees have gone what a garden could look like , the aussie have not got a display this year because of the fires in victoria , they have not recovered yet , but hopefully they will be back next year by the way the plastercine display got a plastercine gold medal  ;D

Kiwi

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2009, 10:31 PM »
It was Bee Week in Kiwi-land earlier this month...

Found this article which may interest some...

It's National Bee Week here in New Zealand and the National Beekeepers Association of New Zealand (NBA), Horticulture New Zealand, Organics Aotearoa New Zealand and Plant & Food Research are busy highlighting opportunities of bees and beekeeping in New Zealand.

While the United Kingdom and other Northern Hemisphere countries fight Colony Collapse Disorder and struggle to save disappearing colonies, New Zealand is experiencing a buzz surrounding its bee exports.

NBA chief executive Jim Edwards says NZ exports about about 30,000 kilograms of live bees each year, and according to the NBA, of the 10,500 tonnes of honey produced annually, almost half is exported. Exports of honey are valued at around NZ$71 million, including NZ$4 million of premium organic honey.

The New Zealand honey crop for 2007/08 was estimated at 12,375 tonnes, up 28 percent on the 2006/07 crop of 9666 tonnes, and 17.3 percent higher than the six-year average. The national average was 36 kilograms per hive compared to 30.7 kilograms last season.

New Zealand beekeepers harvest honey from a variety of floral sources including: Clover, Manuka, Rata, Rewarewa, Kamahi, Tawari, Pohutukawa, Thyme, Honey Dew, Borage and Nodding Thistle. Honey is increasingly differentiated according to the flower source, with better blends and more appealing packaging adding value and ensuring more income per kilogram.

Bee week will appropriately climax at the Beehive (Parliament Building) on 5th May.


Also found this...  :o


British beekeepers have imported manuka plants from New Zealand to produce their own version of medicinal manuka honey, which they are selling at 5 (NZ$13) a teaspoonful.

The honey is being produced on the Tregothnan estate in Cornwall.

"At 55 pounds (NZ$144) a small pot, few people will be smearing Tregothnan manuka honey liberally on their breakfast toast any day soon," The Guardian newspaper in London reported.

The estate company claimed the price tag was justified because its 100,000 bees are housed in 20 special hives claimed to be worth 5000 each and have the exclusive run of the garden's manuka bushes.

Tregothnan's garden director, Jonathan Jones, said: "The honey is expensive, but it is Britain's only manuka honey.

"It has become a lifestyle product, a luxury. This year is the first time the plants produced nectar which gave us our first jars, around 100."

Mr Jones said the first consignment was sold through Harvey Nichols in London.

"They were sold to women of a certain age who are very health conscious, but recently we have been getting much wider interest."

The 2m high hives were created by garden architect Robert Myers and are designed to protect the bees from varroa mites that can devastate colonies.

Mr Jones said the hives were innovative, and allowed better air movement and temperature control than normal, smaller hives.

The positioning of the hives, among the manuka bushes, was also important: "If you put the bees next to the manuka bushes they will automatically feed from them".

The honey is claimed to have medicinal qualities and can help ailments including gum disease, sore throats, acne, sunburn and digestive problems.


Trust me, you can buy the original stuff in Sainsburys and Tesco a heckuva lot cheaper  ;)
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jaywit

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2009, 02:32 PM »
Did work for a Jewish lady who ran a Kosher Honey business.No idea how much it was but it couldn't have been as expensive as the one you mentioned

greeny

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2009, 07:11 PM »
hi the bees are looking fine and well in new zealand ,its got a good turn over there with the honey , i bet thet dont use the same ammount of pesticides over there  ???

kennyo

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2009, 08:19 PM »
i was speaking to a friend whose dad is a beekeeper just north of toronto here no problem so far they say cheers ken.

Kiwi

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Re: WHATS HAPPENING TO THE BEES
« Reply #14 on: May 21, 2009, 04:33 AM »
hi the bees are looking fine and well in new zealand ,its got a good turn over there with the honey , i bet thet dont use the same ammount of pesticides over there  ???
We tend to use a lot of herbicides and fungicides (weedkiller) but not a lot of insecticide so you're probably on the right track  ;)
You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.