Author Topic: Guide Bridge Mill  (Read 162 times)

Joyce_in_Canada

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Guide Bridge Mill
« on: April 18, 2018, 06:47 PM »
Hi everyone!  I've been keeping an Album of my own life history for the family's future references, and yesterday in the process I was remembering when I started work at the age of 14 in August 1941 at Guide Bridge Mill on South Street, Guide Bridge.  The building is still there but is now definitely not an aircraft factory!   At that time it was called "Cornercroft (Northern) Ltd.", having been converted into making parts for aeroplanes during WW2, when it was a subsidiary of Cornercroft's in Coventry.   My Mother also worked there on the 6th floor climbing around ailerons and hammering away having climbed up stepladders!    It was very old of course,  having previously been a cotton mill and I remember a lot of the wooden floors were quite slippery and the stone steps between the six floors were very worn, shiny and dark.   Having searched everywhere I can think of on the internet, nowhere can find any information that covered its wartime production of aircraft parts, and conversion to pots and pans after the war ended.  I was still working there when I left to come to Canada in January 1947.   

I know for an absolute certainty Guide Bridge Mill was opened up and converted to wartime production of airplane parts when Cornercrofts in Coventry itself was blitzed  in November 1940, because one of their Managers, a Mr. W.M. Gascoigne, was transferred up to Guide Bridge and he boarded with my Grandma on Albemarle Terrace off Henrietta St.   That was, as well, how I came to be employed there and I still have my employment recommendation letter on their letterhead showing the name as "Cornercroft (Northern) Limited" a subsidiary of Cornercroft, Coventry.   

I realize a lot of the younger members on here wouldn't perhaps remember those times, but I was wondering if any of you with longer memories (like myself at 90 -  :o), have ever found any reference (or photos) to those years at the Guide Bridge Mill.   I also had an Aunt and Uncle (sadly long gone now), who lived at 3 Pelham St. which ran off South St. at the far end of the huge bay-door entrance to the Mill.   Those places are still there now but all with different names.   I do find it rather odd that such a great contribution to the War effort has never been recorded anywhere.   As a matter of fact, they also made the first of the "plastic" items to be manufactured after the war ended.  Egg cups on a plate, each cup being of a different colour - red, yellow, green and blue!   

Perhaps no-one will remember any of this, but I just thought I'd take a chance and hope!!   
Happy Spring everyone, and hope you all have far better weather than we're having here just now with day-time highs of only about 1 or 2C !!!    :(    Joyce







Fudge

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Re: Guide Bridge Mill
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2018, 11:12 AM »
Hi Joyce I will try and find out if there is any info at the Archives and let you know what I find it will be at the end of next week Fudge

Joyce_in_Canada

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Re: Guide Bridge Mill
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2018, 03:51 PM »
Thank you so much, Fudge!   Anything at all would be good to know that I just didn't dream it all in my long-ago past.    ;D  Joyce

Joyce_in_Canada

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Re: Guide Bridge Mill
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2018, 02:19 AM »
Although it obviously didn't mention Guide Bridge Mill.....today I finally found the following quote on a very interesting site that had to do with all the various aspects of WW2 in the UK, quoting statistics, etc..   At least I now know that I wasn't dreaming about the date of the blitz on Coventry, which is why Cornercrofts came to be in Guide Bridge Mill.

Quote:   
   " One devastating raid on Coventry in November 1940 was the biggest air-raid the world had ever seen. 4,330 homes were destroyed and 554 people killed. At one point during the night 200 separate fires burned in the city. "   

It makes one wonder how the people of those times were able to carry on, and even a few survive to live to be still around  today.   ;D  Joyce

 

Joyce_in_Canada

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Re: Guide Bridge Mill
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2018, 11:57 PM »
Hi Fudge.... 
Thanks for your message re your rather unsuccessful visit to the Archives, where there was no mention there either.   I've sent you a reply, but as no one else has posted any replies for me on here, I guess that must be the end of this particular topic.  Again, thanks so much.   Joyce   :)