Author Topic: The town where I was raised  (Read 9166 times)

Too shy

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The town where I was raised
« on: October 16, 2015, 01:58 PM »
No, not Ashton this time but Dukinfield. Although I haven't lived in Dukinfield for over forty years, I have nothing but happy memories of my formative years growing up in the borough. I occasionally drive through - perhaps on my way to Hyde, Woodley, Stockport or Hazel Grove and might still have the odd appointment in the town. Earlier this week, with some time to kill, I walked round some of my old haunts in the (lower) King Street area - the Town Hall, Chapel Street, Astley Street etc. It saddened me to see this once busy part of the town largely reduced to a district in decline. All the major buildings have gone, certainly they're no longer being used for what they were built for. The police station and magistrates court, the post office, Trustee Savings Bank, the gas showrooms, the electricity showrooms - you name, it all the resources have left town. Where once there were bakers, butchers, greengrocers, jewellers, clothing outfitters, newsagents, hardware shops etc, all we are left with now are the inevitable tattoo shops, beauty parlours and take aways and even the pubs are closed down (Gardeners, Newboro, Newmarket, Liberal Club) and converted to other use. The area is as dead as a dodo and is now just a shadow of what I remember from the 1960s before the bulldozers did their work. It's really now just an area that people drive through on their way to somewhere else. I try to describe to younger people what a happy and vibrant place it was when I was growing up there but I don't think I am able to convince them. Such is life.

jaywit

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2015, 08:47 PM »
I can echo that, except for Dukinfield insert Ashton!!!
I know some will disagree but said, need to do a bit of traveling around.

Albert

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2015, 07:47 PM »
Hi jaywit I cant think of anything new in Duky not like Ashton. Duky is the dead end of tameside I think

Son of Nomad

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2015, 01:11 PM »
You are so right Too Shy - as I mentioned on another thread here I recently had to drive over from Lytham to Dukinfield Crematorium and I drove up King Street then left along Astley Street to the Crem and I was utterly dismayed at seediness of the area around those two streets.

When I was a boy I would catch the bus from Waterloo to Ducky on Saturday mornings, collect my cousin who lived at the UCP tripe shop on Astley Street and we would go round the corner to the Princess Cinema to see Hopalong Cassidy, The Three Stooges etc. I know it's easy to criticise and one must not live in the past but it was sad to now see where I have so many happy childhood memories. As for Ashton, well, although I didn't go into the centre, the area where Arcadia was on Stamford Street seemed to be nothing but bypasses, traffic lights, roundabouts and industrial estates (but I could be wrong!)

jaywit

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2015, 01:37 PM »
" nothing but bypasses, traffic lights, roundabouts and industrial estates "
And there again you could be spot on.
I found it a nightmare walking from the market to Asda.

greeny

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2015, 02:47 PM »
hi yes dukinfield never spent much of my time there, the king street side looks a bit run down but creacent road side not to bad but we just pass through ducky these days  :)

brian seward

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2015, 03:44 AM »
We used to go to the Town Hall for dances now and then, and there used to be a pub nearby that let us underaged   16/17 in for a drink at intermission we went in his own living room!!.
Do not remember the name. but happy memories. I recall taking a girl home up to Dewsnap lane, and then walking home to Montague Rd. I doubt young folk would walk two blocks nowadays?.

KENNETHO

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2015, 04:10 AM »
we used to go to ducky townhall dancing 40s and50s it was a great place in those days cheers. kennetho

Fudge

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2015, 11:31 AM »
I have two Grandsons the eldest is very active with sports but ask him to walk anywere he looks at you though you are mad. the younger one walks miles and hates public transport earlier in the year he walked  from Rosehill nr Kings Rd to Hyde Clarendon Colledge some people enjoy walking Fudge

KENNETHO

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2015, 02:21 PM »
tou wont see the kids today knocking on their friends door and say are you coming with us we are going for a walk up to pike..?? bring a butty .. cheers

Too shy

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2015, 02:20 PM »
My original point wasn't to necessarily denigrate the town, but more to highlight my sadness at how the town had changed. Northern, industrial towns like ours have had tremendous prosperity which, in most cases, has now moved on and left merely debris behind. Sometimes even the debris has been removed with little to indicate what had been there. Times have changed but perhaps they haven't been helped by the town planners who have allowed certain trends to take over - the dominance of the motor car, ring roads here and ring roads there, when in doubt pull it down and make a car  park, the multi nationals, out of town shopping etc. We are now left in Tameside with town centres which are just a pale shadow of what they were in our parents' and grandparents' generations. Perhaps we just have to live with it.

Son of Nomad

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2015, 04:53 PM »
To illustrate how one area has changed here is a photo I took in 1977 from Slate Lane bridge showing the slag heaps from Ashton Moss Colliery. You can just make out Tudno Mill and St Peters Church in the far distance. I believe only the railway line survives today of the foreground features.



Joyce_in_Canada

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #12 on: October 23, 2015, 06:00 AM »
The changes in Ashton seem to have taken place even over here too and not only where I live.    I was only speaking today with my niece and remembering all the beautiful independent shops and large stores that existed in many cities when I first came to Canada in 1947.  It didnt matter what you were looking for, you could find it.  London, Ontario, where I live is no exception.  Over the last 25 years there's hardly a shred left of the vibrant place it was then, and everywhere you shop nowadays for no matter what item, you see the same dull things over and over.  Big Box places have eliminated all the beautiful independent shops and we've been left with nothing but "garbage".  Even Royal Doulton (china) is now made in China and not the potteries in Burslem, U.K., and neither one of us could think of a real "China Shop" where you could once find endless varieties of lovely china and tableware.  All household furniture seems to be in the colours of black, brown, beige, grey or white with black, white or stainless steel appliances!!!  My niece lives near to the Greater Toronto area and as she can never find anything "different", it would appear this trend is everywhere.     
With our new City Council and Mayor last year (the previous ones thrown out because of their corruptness that came to light), and now a totally new Canadian Liberal Government with Justin Trudeau elected Monday with their promises, it sounds as though they're going to even change our bus transit system and establish "ring roads" and pedestrian only areas downtown.  What for I can't imagine, as all there is left down there are seedy stores and, alas, homeless people wandering the shabby main street.  It's so sad, and all we can hope for is that sooner or later this fresh Council will choose the right path to bring back some prosperity.  There are thousands out of work with the closing down of large manufacturers like Kellogs (Cereals) and off-shoots of car manufacturing being taken down to places like Mexico for cheaper labour, and the out of work people  now relying on food banks and welfare, etc.   The only new sectors seem to be in the technical trades of the internet, etc.
I rather doubt now that I will eventually live long enough to see any great improvement, but there's always hope that somewhere out there are people who have better dreams and bring back independent and imaginitive entrepreneurs.   
In the meantime, it's still wonderful to remember all those lovely independent places of my earlier days both in England and Canada. and I still say I lived through what were the best of times where you could get a job and if you worked hard enough, you could at least get ahead and make some of your dreams come true.    :) :)

Fudge

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2015, 10:25 AM »
Jocye It seems like the colours are a fashion they will go out and new ones come in but as you say about china cups and mugs are not like the thin bone china what I am use to I managed to get a few mugs at a shop in Wales that made there own and are quite thin but to no avail in Ashton clothes are a problem to as they are all the same but not to worry we had a good time when we were younger don't envy the youth of today Fudge

Meg

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Re: The town where I was raised
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2015, 12:27 PM »
I think we can all look back to a " golden age" when, despite a great deal of poverty, people seemed to have money to spend ( probably because there was plenty of work). So many factors involved in degradation of town centres: increased use of the car, supermarkets and Internet shopping, lack of jobs or jobs that pay paltry wages that have to be topped up by Government benefits.
the shops in the out of town shopping centre where I live always seem busy but not sure how much people are actually buying or is wandering round the shops a leisure time activity? The centre of town, the traditional high street has its share of mobile phone shops, nail bars, " art" galleries but no bakery, no greengrocer, no fishmonger or hardware store.
"Minds are like parachutes, they only function when open"  Thomas Dewar