Author Topic: Wakes week  (Read 43108 times)

Ashtongirl

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Wakes week
« on: July 03, 2015, 12:54 PM »
Apologies if this has been discussed before. I guess that wakes weeks no longer exist. The whole of the town shut for a week, what did people do who didn't go away for the week? We always went to Rhyl or Llandudno, the weather was usually good. There was a competition in one of the papers where you could challenge Lobby Lud and if it was him you got 5. My dad was always been stopped much to our amusement, I think there was a similar one called Chalky White in another paper. Does the fair still turn up for Wakes week?

Martin

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2015, 06:36 PM »
At the time the 'Lobby Lud' challenge started, in 1927, 5 was worth around 250 in today's money. It was started by the Westminster Gazette, which was taken over by the Daily News, which was taken over by the Daily Mail.

Each day, the paper published the name of the resort 'Lobby' would be visiting, along with a description of 'Lobby'. To claim the money, people had to be carrying a copy of that day's paper and say the words "You are Lobby Lud and I claim my 5."

Apparently a lot of people went up to Lobby and said things like "'Ere - you're that Lobby Lud, ain't you?" to which Lobby would reply "You're making a mistake." Usually the challengers would just apologise and walk off.

It was the Daily Mirror that copied the idea with its own character, 'Chalkie White', which was the name of cartoon character Andy Capp's friend.
Martin

KENNETHO

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2015, 07:05 PM »
was there also one  named percy pickles cheers kennetho

Fudge

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2015, 10:39 AM »
Wakes Fortnight is the 2nd and 3rd week of Aug some people still have them and say it my Wakes holidays but many now take it when it suits them Fudge

Ashtongirl

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2015, 09:19 PM »
In the 1950's all the shops shut and if you didn't go away for the week there was always day trips on Shipley's coaches. I can remember going to Morecambe or Southport for the day. On the way home the coach would stop at a pub. The grown ups would be inside and the kids would be outside with a bottle of Vimto and a bag of crisps. Happy days!

PJackson

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2015, 07:07 PM »
All I can remember of Ashton wakes was the fair. It was on the site that is now IKEA. I think it stopped in the 80s.

Fudge

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2015, 10:01 PM »
Before that it was on Ashton Market Fudge

ayess

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2015, 02:12 AM »
Just reading your short reply, Fudge, took me back to the 1940's Wakes fairs and the "Dragon" ride. Perhaps not the most scary ride, perhaps not the most up to date ride, even then. But it seemed the epitome of what the Wakes was all about. Stay well, Ayess.

herby

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2015, 04:42 AM »
HI
         I think on Wakes week most of Ashton went to Blackpool.Walking down the prom was like walking down Stamford St on Saturday afternoon.   There was a Percy Pickles, I think it was the Daily Dispatch he was in, he had a bit of a big nose, we used to go up to blokes with their girlfriends waving the paper and shouting you are Percy Pickles that used to be about as far as we got before we got the Bugger off. Oh Happy days      herby
   

herby

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2015, 04:47 AM »
Hi
          I thought the Net Boats used to be the scariest   herby

Joyce_in_Canada

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2015, 12:35 AM »
I know what you mean about the "Dragon" ride Ayess!!  I've had some of my happiest times on the Ashton Market fair grounds during Wakes Week in 1943 and l944 when I was 16 and 17!!!!.   The crowds and music, the draught from the rides as they swished by as you stood on the steps going up to get on them, coconut shies and games, and the exciting noise, etc., and of course the people you met.  I do so wish I could remember the last name of the sailor I met there.   He called himself "Johnnie" (but it was really Nigel), and he was lovely.  He lived in Audenshaw on the main road near The Trough, but that was a long time ago now, and after he went back to sea I never saw him again, although I know he came back home eventually and used to go in the George & Dragon and knew my friend, Dorothy Wagstaffe of Dukinfield.  I wonder if they, like you and I, Ayess, are still around somewhere?   Such happy days and memories, even if there was a War on.   ;D :)  I've always felt myself really lucky to have known such times, people and places.   ;D

Sometimes, Herby, my family and Grandma and Aunts  went altogether to Blackpool too during Wakes Week when I was even younger, and still have black and white photos of us riding on donkeys or digging in the sand.  They were lovely boarding houses we stayed at along the Prom front with their long gardens leading up to them in those days and I just loved our holidays.  I doubt if anything is now just like those long-ago days we knew and their wonderful and happy atmospheres, and when I was older, dancing in the Ballroom in Blackpool Tower.  Lovely!       

Fudge

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2015, 10:13 AM »
I was born in 1947 So I missed the war years. But like you Joyce I loved the excitment of the fair can't remember the ride you went on but I loved the Speedway and the Big Wheel like you waiting on the steps. The wonderful smells of candy floss I would always win a coconut and a gold fish poor fish never lasted long Happy times Fudge

Son of Nomad

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2015, 11:57 AM »
As a boy at Ashton Wakes time I was addicted to the slot machines where you flicked a switch and a ball bearing whizzed round and usually disappeared down a losing hole. In those days you put in old halfpennies and pennies. My dad would give me a handful of coins and a minute later I would be back for more, having lost the lot.
One good thing about Blackpool and other resorts in those days was the street photographers. I have a few nice shots of me and my parents there that I wouldn't have otherwise because relatively few people had cameras.
I cycled up to North Pier, Blackpool a couple of times this summer and it was noticeable that fewer people go on the sands today compared with the 1940s and 1950s. I don't think you can rent a deck chair today either.
I enjoyed reading your memories Joyce - I also can remember some of the boarding houses we stayed in - but that's another story!

Joyce_in_Canada

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2015, 02:31 PM »
Hi Son-of-Nomad!    ;D  I was always fascinated by the way the "cranes" in the penny machines would pick up what you hoped you'd get, and then drop the prize just before it got to where it would deliver it to you.    :o   You've also just reminded me of the photographers in Blackpool.  One of the nicest old black & white photos I have is of my dear Mum standing by watching as my younger brother and I had our pictures taken walking along together near the pier and I'm wearing a lovely new pink cotton dress with little flowers on it.   Memorable because there's no way you could ever find such wonderful cotton dresses nowadays.    I also have another small photo which was taken in one of those little booths with the curtain and you got a strip of head and shoulders pictures.    Such great memories!!    The weather always seemed so lovely and sunny too, although I'm sure it rained some times - usually on the Saturday you were either arriving or leaving Blackpool!!!   ;D   

ayess

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Re: Wakes week
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2015, 02:30 AM »
Reading your reply Joyce reminded me of when "Our Mam" decided we were big enough to graduate from the "Dragon" to the "Waltzer". I don't know whether I was pleased or terrified the first time on the "Waltzer" but that is another story. We didn't go to Blackpool we went to Southport. My stepfather liked the bowling greens at Southport so that was where we went. Do you know some holidays we even saw the sea, on the western horizon if the tides weren't just right. As you say happy days. A couple of years ago my daughter and I had a trip to the UK. Her first time, her thoughts of Blackpool? She said she had thought the Gold Coast in Queensland was crowded until she saw Blackpool. I'm with you Joyce, I think we lived through the best of times, they may have been the worst of times as well with the depression and the war but the "togetherness" of those times is something younger people will never understand. Yes there was rationing, the blackout and bombing and all the rest but people stood together and helped each other.