Author Topic: Recycling  (Read 5459 times)

GayJ

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Recycling
« on: March 17, 2012, 12:25 PM »

The green thing

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older
woman that she should bring her own shopping bags because plastic bags
weren't good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, "We didn't have this green thing
back in my earlier days."

The cashier responded, "That's our problem today. Your generation did
not care enough to save our environment for future generations."

She was right -- our generation didn't have the green thing in its
day. Back then, we returned milk bottles, pop bottles and beer bottles
to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and
sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and
over. So they really were recycled. We refilled writing pens with ink
instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a
razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade
got dull.
But we didn't have the green thing back in our day.

We walked up stairs, because we didn't have an escalator in every shop
and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn't climb
into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.
But she was right. We didn't have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby's nappies because we didn't have the
throw-away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy gobbling
machine burning up 220 volts -- wind and solar power really did dry
our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from
their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.
But that young lady is right. We didn't have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every
room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief
(remember them?), not a screen the size of the county of Yorkshire .
In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn't have
electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile
item to send in the post, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion
it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn't fire up
an engine and burn petrol just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower
that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn't need to
go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.
But she's right. We didn't have the green thing back then.

We drank water from a fountain or a tap when we were thirsty instead
of demanding a plastic bottle flown in from another country. We
accepted that a lot of food was seasonal and didnít expect that to be
bucked by flying it thousands of air miles around the world. We
actually cooked food that didnít come out of a packet, tin or plastic
wrap and we could even wash our own vegetables and chop our own salad.
But we didn't have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the tram or a bus, and kids rode their bikes to
school or walked instead of turning their mothers into a 24-hour taxi
service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of
sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need a computerized
gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000 miles out in
space in order to find the nearest pizza joint.
But isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old
folks were just because we didn't have the green thing back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a
lesson in conservation from a smart-ass young person.
Remember: Don't make old people mad. We don't like being old in the
first place, so it doesn't take much to piss us off.
Don't let the B***ds grind you down.

KENNETHO

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2012, 02:58 PM »
oh yes i like that cheers

Meg

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2012, 03:20 PM »
Lots of great reminders in there. Gay, when we get complacent about all our gadgets, and disposable this, that and the other!
This caught my eye in today's paper... "Good week for John Lewis stores and supermarkets"......"Strawberry sales were up 45% on the same week last year".   Strawberries in February????   It was unheard of in the past....June and July are strawberry months as far as I'm concerned. Husband remarked that he'd eaten some strawberries at a farewell lunch at work yesterday and they were tasteless.
"Minds are like parachutes, they only function when open"  Thomas Dewar

lydia

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2012, 12:37 AM »
saw this posted about month ago on my facebook so no big issue

Denise

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2012, 10:23 AM »
Same article was emailed to me sometime last year - very thought-provoking though!  I'm sure the older members could add to that list too!   :o
You're only given a little spark of madness, don't waste it!

greeny

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2012, 02:33 PM »
hi is that why we live in a throw away society , i think these young ones have a lot to learn from us oldies  :)

Fudge

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2012, 04:22 PM »
Brilliant Gay. My mum saved Jam Jars half a old pence on them at Maypole. The Milkman took the empty bottles. Pop bottles went back to the shop 3d or 6d return. Waste food and vegetable peel went in pig bin. General rubbish that would burn went on the fire. Clothes were repaired if no longer repairable button remove to use again and Rag and Bone man would take them to be recycled.Bags were made of material that you could use them over and over again. Paper bags that you got food like cooked meats fruit ect in were used again. Dad repaired your shoes and made sure they were polished so the water kept out and lasted longer. Them are some of the Green things that happened when I was a child. Fudge

KENNETHO

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2012, 05:59 PM »
oh yes the pig bin . rag and bone man and cobblers. we used to buy rubber sole and heels and repair our shoes..todaythey dont repair they throw them away,, although some of the things they sell as shoes today are rubbish and cant be repaired..so you can buy more rubbish.. cobblers.. cheers kennetho..

Albert

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2012, 08:46 PM »

We are not innocent in our days we had a coal fire in every house more if you count the chimney pots
We had coal fired power stations still have a few
We had coal fired trains
We had gas works burning coal to make gas and until they found a use for the coke it was tipped
No wonder we had Smog

KENNETHO

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2012, 09:29 PM »
so now we let the cars make our smog cheers..

Albert

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2012, 10:55 PM »
H Kennetho I dont know if you have MOTs for your cars I know they dont
 in Victoria but we pay our road fund tax on the exhaust emissions
   and we dont have Smog like we did  Albert 

KENNETHO

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2012, 11:46 PM »
hi albert we have to have ours checked for emission control also but we still get the smog in the citys. kennetho

GayJ

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2012, 11:50 PM »
My Mum used to unpick woollen sweaters etc and then crochet them into blankets.  I live on my own and it's amazing that I manage to fill four wheelie bins - when we were kids we had one small bin and the ashes from the fire went in there too.  My blue bin is full everytime with cardboard cat food containers.  I can also remember my mum saving slivers of soap and making new bars from them.  She used to save her stockings for at least 6 months before wearing them - apparently they become tougher with age and less likely to snag and ladder - we also used to put a bit of nail varnish on small ladders to stop them getting bigger. Tea bags and egg shells were saved and used in the garden.  Anyone remember backing our books with wallpaper, sticking formica on old kitchen tables and worktops and lining shelves with fablon.
Don't let the B***ds grind you down.

Vanessa

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2012, 12:16 AM »
Gosh I remember using wall paper to back school books, we used the squares from sample books donated by the wallpaper shops.

Vanessa

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Re: Recycling
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2012, 12:24 AM »
Thought I'd get this shameless cut and paste in before this thread goes off the rails ;)

FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    Aye, very passable, that, very passable bit of risotto.
SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:
    Nothing like a good glass of Ch‚teau de Chasselas, eh, Josiah?
THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:
    You're right there, Obadiah.
FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:
    Who'd have thought thirty year ago we'd all be sittin' here drinking Ch‚teau de Chasselas, eh?
FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    In them days we was glad to have the price of a cup o' tea.
SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:
    A cup o' cold tea.
FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:
    Without milk or sugar.
THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:
    Or tea.
FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    In a cracked cup, an' all.
FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:
    Oh, we never had a cup. We used to have to drink out of a rolled up newspaper.
SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:
    The best we could manage was to suck on a piece of damp cloth.
THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:
    But you know, we were happy in those days, though we were poor.
FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    Because we were poor. My old Dad used to say to me, "Money doesn't buy you happiness, son".
FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:
    Aye, 'e was right.
FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    Aye, 'e was.
FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:
    I was happier then and I had nothin'. We used to live in this tiny old house with great big holes in the roof.
SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:
    House! You were lucky to live in a house! We used to live in one room, all twenty-six of us, no furniture, 'alf the floor was missing, and we were all 'uddled together in one corner for fear of falling.
THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:
    Eh, you were lucky to have a room! We used to have to live in t' corridor!
FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    Oh, we used to dream of livin' in a corridor! Would ha' been a palace to us. We used to live in an old water tank on a rubbish tip. We got woke up every morning by having a load of rotting fish dumped all over us! House? Huh.
FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:
    Well, when I say 'house' it was only a hole in the ground covered by a sheet of tarpaulin, but it was a house to us.
SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:
    We were evicted from our 'ole in the ground; we 'ad to go and live in a lake.
THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:
    You were lucky to have a lake! There were a hundred and fifty of us living in t' shoebox in t' middle o' road.
FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    Cardboard box?
THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:
    Aye.
FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    You were lucky. We lived for three months in a paper bag in a septic tank. We used to have to get up at six in the morning, clean the paper bag, eat a crust of stale bread, go to work down t' mill, fourteen hours a day, week-in week-out, for sixpence a week, and when we got home our Dad would thrash us to sleep wi' his belt.
SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:
    Luxury. We used to have to get out of the lake at six o'clock in the morning, clean the lake, eat a handful of 'ot gravel, work twenty hour day at mill for tuppence a month, come home, and Dad would thrash us to sleep with a broken bottle, if we were lucky!
THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:
    Well, of course, we had it tough. We used to 'ave to get up out of shoebox at twelve o'clock at night and lick road clean wit' tongue. We had two bits of cold gravel, worked twenty-four hours a day at mill for sixpence every four years, and when we got home our Dad would slice us in two wit' bread knife.
FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:
    Right. I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night half an hour before I went to bed, drink a cup of sulphuric acid, work twenty-nine hours a day down mill, and pay mill owner for permission to come to work, and when we got home, our Dad and our mother would kill us and dance about on our graves singing Hallelujah.
FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:
    And you try and tell the young people of today that ..... they won't believe you.
ALL:
    They won't!
My pet hate is passing. When my time comes, Iím going to die, Iím refuse to ďpassĒ. I want people to say Iím dead. Brown ******* bread. Any ****** that says I passed, Iíll haunt.